Kirkus Book Review

Marching orders for the “soldiers” of business.

This is a business book with a different spin, and today that is not easy to achieve. Don’t Sell
Yourself Short! is co-authored by the CEO of a talent-development firm, Carroll, and a retired U.S.
Army Master Sergeant, Gill. As a result, the book combines basic employee-motivational techniques
from a business perspective with a unique flavor—gung-ho advice provided by a former noncommissioned officer.

It’s a lively mix, and the book is helpful and entertaining. In Part I, Carroll and Gill begin by detailing some reasons why employees fail, using the technique of contrasting a “manager’s excuses” with “facts.” For example, the manager’s excuse, “Never excelled” is countered by the fact that the employee was “Never taught what it takes to be a top performer.”

In Part II, the authors address an organization’s dynamics, motivating factors, dissatisfaction factors and how to build a personal strategic plan to be successful. In Part III, the reader learns how to apply
the “Be–Know–Do” philosophy of the Army to the work environment. Within each section are inspiring and often humorous motivational quotes.

Also included are anecdotes, business scenarios and such tools as a “Mood Meter and Attitude Chart” and numerous “audit” forms, to assess organizational and personal performance and improvement. Gill even offers the reader an entire section of humorous “Army Lingo” which, he suggests, would be appropriate in a business setting.

Examples include “Go pound sand—take your problem somewhere else,” and “SWAG—a Sophisticated Wild A** Guess.  An estimate or a hypothesis that is unproven, but sounds good.” The terms will provide a welcome chuckle. The overuse of Army-induced philosophy can be heavy-handed at times, but the underlying message is valuable to any employee.

Glorifies employees in the field while poking fun at managers.

From the prestigious Kirkus Book Review

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In The Mood

We’ve been talking about being in the Groove, now we can talk about being in the Mood.  Your Mood is the measure of the motivational climate in the short term.  Think of it as the weather, not the climate.  And it can sunny or cloudy.  It is not in the sky; it is within you.  We referred to it in an earlier section, when we discussed the Mood Meter.

You can manage your mind and your mood by reducing those times that you dwell upon unproductive thinking.  Here are the don’ts:

“CLOUDY” Weather

Don’t think about past problems.

Don’t forget your past successes.

Don’t dwell on past failures.

Don’t downgrade yourself.

Don’t envy others.

Don’t take office news and politics personally.

Don’t hang around with slackers.

Don’t ignore a problematic situation.  Tackle it.

Don’t blame someone else, or the Home Office.

For decades, I suffered through the northern winters.  The skies were gloomy and overcast, the winds blew, snow fell, and it seemed as if everyone was waiting to be happy – waiting for springtime.

But then I moved to Florida, where the sun shines nearly all of the time.  My Mood improved immeasurably, but you wouldn’t believe how many Florida residents find a reason to complain:

“The summers are so hot and sticky.”

No, they’re not!  The heat and humidity [humiture] is just as stifling in the Midwest and North.  The mood is all about your attitude about life and living.  As Morgan Freeman’s character in “Shawshank Redemption” stated it so well:

“Get busy living or get busy dying.”

Cancer survivors know this too well.

“SUNNY” Weather

To create a “Sunny” mood:

Do smile.

Do read a book or see a movie.

Do give thanks for the little things.

Do more than think positive thoughts.  “See” them, “feel” them.

Do give yourself credit.

Do acknowledge that some things are beyond your control.

Do exercise.

Do talk to a mentor.

Do something special for yourself – get a massage, or treat yourself to a facial.

You’ll never know if you’ve “arrived” at a Peak Performance level until you’ve been blessed with the experience of being “In the Zone,” where your Mood, your Skills, and your Intellect are synchronized and electrified.

How important is Mood “in the Zone?”  Allow us to use salespeople as a monument to the importance of Mood.  Literally months of work punctuated by a positive “Can Do” attitude and hope can all be destroyed by a single word . . .

“NO!”

Co-author Steve Carroll is president and CEO of Lee DuBois Technologies (www.leedubois.com).  Lee DuBois Technologies offers sales training and talent development for individuals and corporations.  To purchase a copy of Don’t Sell Yourself Short…Be All That You Can Be!, visit the website, www.dontsellyourselfshort.net .

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Putting Yourself “In the Zone”

We are not talking about your Comfort Zone.  If you are reading this chapter, you are reading it because you want to LEAVE your Comfort Zone.  We see the Comfort Zone Syndrome in sports all the time.  It’s the 12-point-per-game scorer in basketball who has 10 in the first half.  Second half? 3 points.  It’s the 15-handicapper in golf, who shoots 39 on the front nine and 51 on the back.

To leave your Comfort Zone, for those times that you require your best performance, you need to be “In the Zone.”  As former athletes, we called it “psyched,” “pumped up,” “wired,” “on fire,” or “juiced.”

In “The Zone,” it is easy to concentrate.  You have a heightened sense of awareness.  Your adrenaline electrifies you, but you feel strangely calm.

As you perform your job, you feel that you are working at warp speed, getting three times as much done as you would normally.  When you look at the clock, you can’t believe that you have so much time left, because you have been so productive already.

In a terrific book, “Mentally Tough,” James E. Loehr, Ed..D., talks about acting out the role of a confident person.  He suggests observing . . .

“How does a confident person act?  One who stands tall, who speaks with authority, who stays in control.  If you stand tall, speak with authority, and stay in control –in short, if you act like a confident person – then you will become a confident person.”

The basic message is:  Body and mind are very closely connected, so you pay attention to both to set the stage for personal motivation.

Co-author Steve Carroll is president and CEO of Lee DuBois Technologies (www.leedubois.com).  Lee DuBois Technologies offers sales training and talent development for individuals and corporations.  To purchase a copy of Don’t Sell Yourself Short…Be All That You Can Be!, visit the website, www.dontsellyourselfshort.net .

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Looking Inside Yourself

Do you have what it takes – inside you – to make it happen?  We think you do, because you invested in this book to make something happen.  Here are the components of Inner Strength that can create the foundations for your personal Self-Starter model:

Components of Inner Strength

Self Confidence – Belief in your ability to create your own destiny.

Integrity – Belief in a set of values to live by.

Self Talk – An interior monologue that is constructed to support and praise yourself for  good work.  Replace Fear Statements with Desire Statements; Solutions with Problems, and Answers with Questions.

Individuality – Recognize your own personal uniqueness; what make you special.  Don’t depend on theories or philosophies for answers, just treat them as sources of guidance.

Self Responsibility – Demand 100 % accountability from yourself.  You are responsible for both benefits and problems that occur as a result of your actions and decisions.

Optimism – Treat mistakes as a chance to learn.  Never focus on them.  Don’t get down on yourself.  Everyone makes mistakes.

Persistence – Keep on, keeping on.  Persistent people live in the Present Tense; they live for NOW, because the Present is the one tense that they can control.

Faith – Some call it inner strength; some call it faith.  “Greater is he that’s within me that’s within the world.”

And speaking of faith, Robert Schuler, the terrific minister at the Crystal Cathedral, talks about Possibility Thinkers.  His short treatise on the four types of thinkers lead us to another Inner Strength:

In Power Thinking, Dr. Schuler categorizes those who think:

1.  “PLOW” thinkers – those who plow new ground, striving for creativity.

2.  “HOW” thinkers – Strive to learn

3.  “VOW” thinkers – Vow to reach higher and make a difference

4.  NOW” thinkers – Start NOW!

Visualization – Jack Nicklaus, one of the greatest performers under pressure ever, called the visualization process “Mental Movies.” The process of visualization starts with:

Do you “See” yourself as:

- Focused?
- In control?
- Calm?
- Relaxed?
- Energized?

Or do you “See” yourself as:

- Depressed?
- Powerless?
- Bored?
- Afraid?
- Tired?

Co-author Steve Carroll is president and CEO of Lee DuBois Technologies (www.leedubois.com).  Lee DuBois Technologies offers sales training and talent development for individuals and corporations.  To purchase a copy of Don’t Sell Yourself Short…Be All That You Can Be!, visit the website, www.dontsellyourselfshort.net .

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Can You Be Motivated

Movement versus Motivation

Remember the sign in the Indiana countryside at the beginning of the chapter?

“If you cross this field, you had better do it in 9.8 seconds.
The bull can do it in 10 seconds.”

NO TRESPASSING

The sign represents Movement, not Motivation.  Dr. Herzberg describes a family who has a problem with their dog sleeping on a designer rug, so they employ KITA and kick the dog every time it sleeps on the rug.  What happens, then, every time they leave the house?  Of course, the dog is back on the rug.

What is their mistake?  They are employing the concept of Movement, not Motivation.

You want to be motivated — to feel good about your achievements, performance, and feel that you are being appreciated for your contributions.  You want to feel that you and your work have Value.  Well, before you unlock the code to your own Motivational Puzzle, there are five key questions that you must ask yourself:

OneDo you want something in your job? Your career?  If you have no goal, there will be no productive movement from your present position.

TwoIs there a way for you to achieve your goals? Do you see a path to achievement that can be attained through hard work, imagination, and cooperation?

ThreeDo you believe that your efforts will be rewarded? You must have faith that something positive will happen if you do the job and do it well.

FourDo you know what your job is? You’ve got to know what it takes to be successful.  The job – its responsibilities and its possibilities – must be accurately defined up front.  Then you can look for ways to enrich that job.

FiveDo you recognize how you can separate yourself as a top performer? You must know how you can be empowered and recognized.

Co-author Steve Carroll is president and CEO of Lee DuBois Technologies (www.leedubois.com).  Lee DuBois Technologies offers sales training and talent development for individuals and corporations.  To purchase a copy of Don’t Sell Yourself Short…Be All That You Can Be!, visit the website, www.dontsellyourselfshort.net .

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Job Dissatisfiers

While Job Motivators are related to JOB CONTENT, Job Dissatisfiers are related to the JOB ENVIRONMENT, and are the primary sources of unhappiness with the Job.  They are what Dr. Herzberg calls “Hygiene Factors,” because they have a dirtyclean aspect.

The opposite of these Dissatisfaction Factors are NO UNHAPPINESS, not HAPPINESS.  In other words, just because these Job Dissatisfiers are not resident in your workplace, doesn’t mean that the workplace is a motivating environment.  But if they are resident, they can de-motivate you.

Here are the key Job Dissatisfiers:

I.  Company Policy & Administration

Definition: The Company policies, procedures and bureaucracies that    adversely  affect the ability to function effectively.

II.  Supervision

Definition: The pervasive Management Style of the Company – how they plan, organize, direct and control work activities.

III.  Relationship with Supervisor

Definition: The individual worker’s relationship with his/her immediate-report manager.

IV.  Work Conditions

Definition: The physical work conditions that can impact attitude, performance, pride, mood …

V.   Earnings

Definition: The total compensation package – amount, structure,     opportunity for  raises, consistency and fairness.

VI.  Peer Relationships

Definition: The general mood, attitude and overall relationship  between workplace soldiers.

VII.  Personal Life

Definition: Personal life or family problems – or other personal  siuations that may affect performance.

VIII.  Status

Definition: The worker’s perception of their Job’s status in the eyes of   the  Company, their family, and community.

IX.   Security

Definition: One’s comfort zone, a perception of a safety net, a secure   future for self and family.  It is “Peace of Mind.”

Co-author Steve Carroll is president and CEO of Lee DuBois Technologies (www.leedubois.com).  Lee DuBois Technologies offers sales training and talent development for individuals and corporations.  To purchase a copy of Don’t Sell Yourself Short…Be All That You Can Be!, visit the website, www.dontsellyourselfshort.net .

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What The Real Experts Say About Motivation

“Gurus?  Fuhgettaboutit!”

What the Real Experts Say About Motivation

Once in a great while, someone comes along who “unlocks a code.”

-  Ted Williams on the “Secrets of Hitting”

-  Peter Lynch on the  “Secrets of Investing”

-  Sam Walton on the  “Secrets of Retailing”

-  John Gray in “Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus.”

On the subject of workplace motivation, we are convinced that Dr. Frederick Herzberg is our quintessential code breaker.  Dr. Herzberg has written articles on Motivation that have been the most successful ever written in the prestigious Harvard Business Review.

Dr. Herzberg begins his treatise by listing the five ways to get someone to do something as positive KITA.  The term KITA is, as you can guess, a delicate way of saying that some employees need a “Kick In The Ass” to motivate them.

The five ways to get someone to do something are:

1. Ask’em

2. Tell’em

3. Give’em money

4. Show’em how

5. Kick’em

Unfortunately, most managers apply the KITA approaches. Here is a more comprehensive review of Dr. Herzberg’s Job Motivators and Dissatisfiers and what you need to do to access them.  They certain deserve this second look.

Job Motivators

The four main Job Motivators are resident in JOB CONTENT, and if in place, lead to JOB SATISFACTION.  We will define each Motivator, then we will list a 5-Star “To Do’s” list that will help you to improve the motivating nature of your workplace.

I.  Achievement

Definition: Accomplishment of objectives and realization of goals.

To Do’s:

  • Define the word “Achievement” and what it means to you . . .    personally
  • Arrive at mutual agreement with supervisor on specific goals to be achieved
  • Set specific checkpoints for assessment
  • Identify and remove roadblocks to Performance
  • Decide what it takes for you to “do a good day’s work”

“Men of genius do not excel in a profession because they labor in it;
they labor in it because they excel.”
William Hazlitt

II.  Advancement

Definition: Getting ahead in the organization and growing in the job by building a climate of personal psychological growth.

To Do’s:

  • Categorize effort into three categories  – minimal, expected, and extraordinary
  • Think creatively to decide on what constitutes extraordinary performance
  • Verify with the manager how you will be advanced and how you can grow
  • Promote a sense of cooperation toward tasks
  • ?Be consistent in maintaining high work standards

III.  Recognition/Appreciation of Contribution

Definition: Awarding and recognizing achievement of positive performance  “For all tosee.”

To Do’s:

  • Use Sincere Compliments as a tool for Recognition
  • Ask for the 3 P’s . . . Points, Pens, and Plaques
  • ?Introduce new people to everyone in the organization
  • ?Realization that EACH person’s work does create Value
  • Extra credit should be given for new and better ways to serve Customers

“The two things that people want more than sex and money
are recognition and praise.”
Mary Kay Ash

IV.  Responsibility

Definition: Assigning accountability to tasks while giving the leeway and authority to allow task completion.

To Do’s:

  • ??When given responsibility, ALWAYS ask for Authority!
  • Determine how the task(s) fit into the “Big Picture”
  • When given responsibility, trust management to get out of your way and let you get the Job done
  • When given responsibility, trust management to let you “Fix what is wrong”
  • Focus on “What is right”

V.  The Work

Definition: This is “The Job.”  The potential growth areas are Job Enrichment and Job                               Enlargement.

To Do’s:

  • Sit with the Manager and identify how the Job can be made richer.
  • Sit with the Manager and identify how the Job can be made larger.
  • Approach the Job with the attitude that it can be changed; i.e., made better.
  • ??Resist Mentoring others, which is not Job Enlargement, it is just Job Loading.  It is the process whereby management relinquishes his/her responsibility to coach and counsel [especially new employees] and passes it on to you.  But do they give you any

Authority – no!  Just more work!

Co-author Steve Carroll is president and CEO of Lee DuBois Technologies (www.leedubois.com).  Lee DuBois Technologies offers sales training and talent development for individuals and corporations.  To purchase a copy of Don’t Sell Yourself Short…Be All That You Can Be!, visit the website, www.dontsellyourselfshort.net .

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Bottom 20 Employee Motivators

Since surveyors went to the trouble of making a list of 10 Top Motivators and 10 Top Satisfiers, then there must be at least 20 on the bottom list.

The Bottom 20 Motivators and Satisfiers

1.    Lack of follow through

2.    Procrastination

3.    White lies

4.    Favoritism

5.    Constant procedural changes

6.    No management support

7.    Failure to have goals and objectives stated

8.    Poor facilities

9.    Low commissions

10.  Ineffective marketing programs

11.  Lack of recognition

12.  Lack of challenge

13.  No incentives

14.  Too many meetings

15.  Too few meetings

16.  Paychecks are incorrect

17.  Meetings are too long

18.  Smoking

19.  Condoning deviations

20.  Autocratic management

You could construct your own Bottom List, too, but I’ll bet that they would be in a different order!  In fact, if we make a survey of everyone in your department or your company, the results would be different every time.

We must conclude that there is no universal Motivation Formula, but there are have been many Human Resource Scientists who have researched the subject of Motivation.

What we do know is this:  If you believe that you are Money-Obsessed, you are mis-guiding yourself.  You are, in fact, motivated by WHAT MONEY CAN DO FOR YOU.

There is a major difference between WHAT people want and WHY they want it.  Goal-oriented employees know the difference; they have unlocked the code.

TALENT SOLUTION: Money is a means, not a goal. Realign your thinking.  We think about money because we can see it, touch it, and talk about it.  X number of $$$ is a tangible.

So think about what you want to do with the raise.  Make your goals tangible; for example, “I want to get a bigger house with a yard for the kids.” You will “see them playing on the swings!” You will “hear their laughter!” Use your five senses.  See it.  Feel it.  Talk about it.  Make it an obsession.

Co-author Steve Carroll is president and CEO of Lee DuBois Technologies (www.leedubois.com).  Lee DuBois Technologies offers sales training and talent development for individuals and corporations.  To purchase a copy of Don’t Sell Yourself Short…Be All That You Can Be!, visit the website, www.dontsellyourselfshort.net .

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Motivators and Satisfiers – What Employees Say

Earlier, we outlined the two sets of factors – Motivators and Dissatisfiers, based on the years of excellent research by a true motivational guru, Dr. Frederick Herzberg. In this section, we will amplify his guiding principles and show you how to apply his valuable lessons in your workplace.

Years ago, a study asked workers to rank the Top 10 Motivators and the Top 10 Satisfiers.  It was a non-scientific study, but we think that you’ll agree that it does do a good job of summarizing what employees hope for – and dread.

Employees want:

Top 10 Motivators

1.    Good chance for advancement

2.    A job with good pay

3.    A job with pay tied to performance

4.    Recognition for good work

5.    A job which enables me to develop my abilities

6.    A challenging job

7.    A job where I can think for myself

8.    A great deal of responsibility

9.    Interesting work

10.  A job requiring creativity

Top 10 Satisfiers

1.    A job without too much rush and stress

2.    A convenient location

3.    Good working conditions

4.    Working with people I like

5.    Getting along with my supervisor

6.    Being informed about what goes on

7.    Being able to control the work place

8.    Flexible working hours

9.    Good fringe benefits

10.  Fair treatment

If you were to make your own list, it would probably be similar.  These utopian wishes are nearly universal, but in the New Economy, they are almost unattainable.  This is due to a number of factors which we call the Four Contingencies:

1.  Uncertainty

2.  Risks

3. Volatility

4.  Information Overload

These four issues are addressed in our training programs, as they affect our Finances, our Work, and our Families.  Watch for them in our website Blogs and Webinars at www.leedubois.com.

Co-author Steve Carroll is president and CEO of Lee DuBois Technologies (www.leedubois.com).  Lee DuBois Technologies offers sales training and talent development for individuals and corporations.  To purchase a copy of Don’t Sell Yourself Short…Be All That You Can Be!, visit the website, www.dontsellyourselfshort.net .

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Motivation – “Setting Your Hair On Fire”

A sign on a fence in the Indiana countryside:
“If you cross this field you had better do it in 9.8 seconds.  The bull can do it in 10 seconds.”

If you think that this is a motivational message, you are equating threats with motivation.  Have we got good news for you!

With the authors’ combined 50 + years of management and sales experience, we’ve seen’em all – Zig Ziglar, Dennis Waitley, Lou Holtz, Anthony Robbins, countless celebrities and former athletes.  They have revealed valuable insights, rekindled a fire, reset our moods, got our heads on straight, or just made us smile.

And they are very good at it, so the next time you want a quick fix, be our guest –  attend a seminar or listen to a rah-rah tape.

What we want to talk about is what motivates employees, what satisfies employees, and what motivates you – those things that make you tuned in, turned on, for the long term.

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